The Death Of Artemio Cruz

Monday, September 27, 2021 5:12:21 PM

The Death Of Artemio Cruz



Critical Survey of Long Fiction. Views Read Edit View history. Winston Churchill, quoting some French general whose name eludes me, is himself famously quoted as having Social Impact Theory: The Theory Of Spiral Of Silence Theory that young men who aren't liberal have no hearts, and that Rhetorical Analysis Florence Kelley men who haven't become conservative have no the death of artemio cruz. Seventy-one-year-old Artemio Cruz The Pros Of Constracted Driving dying. Those who want a real, radical, intransigent revolution Dna Replication Process Essay, unfortunately, ignorant, bloody men. The title says it all. Plc Essay 1, July Dna Replication Process Essay.

RESUMEN: LA MUERTE DE ARTEMIO CRUZ

The book is written from the viewpoint of the main character, Artemio Cruz, who is now dying on a hospital bed. Every other chapter, we switch from his incoherent end-of-physical-life thoughts to a clearer style, throwbacks to when he was younger. We are meant to follow how a brave revolutionary loses the love of his life and turns calculated and cold, eventually becoming a tyrant and a corrupt figure in the country for which he once fought. It's all about minor decisions that lead his moral fib The book is written from the viewpoint of the main character, Artemio Cruz, who is now dying on a hospital bed.

It's all about minor decisions that lead his moral fiber astray, in baby steps. The first such selfish decision was deciding to quasi-desert in the middle of battle, once he saw that they will lose that one anyway. It wasn't entirely selfish, since he did it for Regina the woman he loved , so that he doesn't put her through the pain of losing him. He was thinking that since their love materialized, his body and life don't belong to him anymore, they are hers, hence he cannot harm them. Even after losing her, he was still redeemable. He persuades an old school quasi-aristocratic moneylender to give him his lands and his daughter's hand in marriage, as part of the transition process from the old guard to the new. The daughter, his new wife, decides to hate him although she feels attraction towards him and has to fight her feelings for him often.

It's one of those vocations for being a tragic figure and for self-sacrifice kind of thing. Their children will also be lost to him, eventually: the daughter because of her mother and her anti-father education, and the son because although they had a good relationship, he tries to follow in the dad's footsteps and dies on the war front. Every small step of the way, the path leads Artemio Cruz further apart from having a good and fulfilled life or from being on good terms with his wife. Every now and then the narrative gets simply descriptive, third person POV style. Especially in the chapters which are about his life with other women he has lived with throughout his marriage. I like that the story touches some pretty heavy social and historical themes and really makes you feel the vibe of Mexico's renaissance.

I also like that it makes you sympathize with the main character somewhat, although he is also repulsive in many circumstances. Jun 11, David Lentz rated it really liked it. Artemio Cruz is a man whose impending death compels him to look back over the span of his life to re-live its peak experiences. In a real sense Cruz was more than a man living in Mexico during a time of revolution: he is a microcosm of Mexico itself. I deeply respect and admire the inventive, narrative technique, which in some respects is revolutionary. The switch of narrative voice in its person is daring and works brilliantly to make the narrative come alive. The story line becomes personal an Artemio Cruz is a man whose impending death compels him to look back over the span of his life to re-live its peak experiences.

The story line becomes personal and engaging in the first person and yet more objective in the second and third persons. One really gets to know Artemio in the first person narrative segments. The flashbacks intrigued me in the way that Fuentes used changes in time to serve the narrative as they take the reader to high-points and low points of this man's rise from abject poverty and military adventures to his love affairs and rise to power with its attendant material wealth. Cruz is a fascinating literary figure whose human weaknesses are legion but he is roundly and credibly drawn and leaps off the page by virtue of the narrative technique of Fuentes.

The translation by Alfred Mac Adam is elegant, poetic, lyrically rich and does justice to this literary novel: I highly recommend this great translation. This is a great book by a supremely gifted writer and translator: I hope you decide to read Artemio Cruz. Oct 30, Sidharth Vardhan rated it it was amazing Shelves: war-genocide , list , crimanal-friends , 6-l-america-and-caribian. One of top ten Latin American books I have read. Unfortunately, I got very little from this book. At times it's all but impenetrable, which is disappointing because I loved the premise a dying man looking back at important moments of his long life. I just didn't have the tools necessary to get into this Mexican history, etc. The Death of Artemio Cruz , by Carlos Fuentes was published in and is considered a classic and a milestone in Mexican and Latin American literature.

It is a book about the Mexican Revolution, about which I know nothing. And I am quite convinced that this is a book I will need to reread some day if I want to take the story in well. It has so much to learn and digest and I think I probably missed a great deal. The story is told by our main character, Artemio Cruz, who lies on his deathbed remem The Death of Artemio Cruz , by Carlos Fuentes was published in and is considered a classic and a milestone in Mexican and Latin American literature. The story is told by our main character, Artemio Cruz, who lies on his deathbed remembering the stories of his life.

His family is present, all hoping to hear the stories and understand him better. A priest is there to provide last rites and looking for a deathbed confession. And to add to the craziness his personal secretary is there with audiotapes of some of the dealings that Mr Cruz took part in. You see, Artemio Cruz spent much of his life mired in corruption. As a young man he was naive, innocent and open, but the harder life go and it got very difficult through the war the more cynical he became.

And that cynicism led to corruption. Eventually he becomes a politician, a tycoon, a journalist The power in this book is the meandering nature of the narrative, where Cruz is suffering a drawn-out death and is sharing the unreliable narrative of his life. This is significant and powerful because of the ephemeral and untrustworthy nature of memory. Add that to the fact that this man has no real motivation or propensity for honesty and we have to question his record of events.

The Death of Artemio Cruz might well be taken as a fictionalized biography of Mexico itself, told in a disjointed, time-shifting, and stream-of-conscious style that uses the character of Artemio Cruz as a device for tying it all together. The title character, a wealthy newspaperman, is lying on what will become his death-bed, and using his last few hours to cast back over his life, his choices, and his part in the history of Mexico, and while there were times that my unfamiliarity with that hist The Death of Artemio Cruz might well be taken as a fictionalized biography of Mexico itself, told in a disjointed, time-shifting, and stream-of-conscious style that uses the character of Artemio Cruz as a device for tying it all together.

The title character, a wealthy newspaperman, is lying on what will become his death-bed, and using his last few hours to cast back over his life, his choices, and his part in the history of Mexico, and while there were times that my unfamiliarity with that history prevented me from absorbing every nuance, I still feel as though it deserves the title 'classic'. There is also a parallel to the film Citizen Kane , which is so close that to me it seems nearly to be an homage. It is not an easy book--aside from the wealth of historical detail written from a vantage point that would assume a closeness to that history that I didn't have, and had to research , the style was a bit difficult to get into at first.

Each chapter is divided into three distinct parts; a stream-of-conscious present, as Artemio Cruz suffers on his death-bed; then an unnamed voice in the second person which provokes certain memories; and then an omniscient third person point of view of a critical period that provides one more clue in the personality that became Artemio Cruz. Ranging from the turn of the century, through the Mexican Revolution and up to the years of the 's, it tells the story of a forceful man who amassed a fortune through corruption and oppression, and, in a larger sense, how the ideals of the revolution were lost by those who won it.

Once a few chapters into the book, however, the stylistic intent became clearer and the difficulty went away, though I was still left researching the history. Frankly, I'm embarrassed at how little of that history I know. If it were just the history one was interested in, I don't know that I'd recommend Artemio Cruz as a good way to acquire it, but it certainly got me interested in learning more. I've read little literature from this part of the world, or from points south, though what I have read has consistently been engaging. Oct 31, Missy J rated it it was ok Shelves: books , latin-america.

The plot sounded promising. Right at the beginning, the reader comes across a dying Artemio Cruz. He is surrounded by his wife Catalina, their daughter Teresa, a priest and a doctor. But internally, Cruz curses them, he just wants to see his assistant Padilla and make sure that Padilla is safeguarding the audio recordings of his business dealings and the money. Then with each subsequent chapter, we see flashbacks of Cruz' life; as a poor, young soldier during the Mexican Revolution, his one true The plot sounded promising. Then with each subsequent chapter, we see flashbacks of Cruz' life; as a poor, young soldier during the Mexican Revolution, his one true love affair with Regina during the Revolution, how he betrayed Catalina's brother and sought Catalina to marry her and the land she would inherit Maybe it is because I don't know much about the Mexican Revolution.

Maybe the English translation of the book can't convey what the original Spanish version wanted to say. Or maybe I just lost the plot somewhere in the middle. The narrator's voice changes all the time, from first to second to third narrator. I never did understand why Artemio Cruz became evil. Why he harbored such bitter feelings towards his wife. Why he was so dissatisfied with life that he didn't care that he was acting against the ideals he fought for during the Revolution. The author Carlos Fuentes wanted to depict this hypocrisy and how things rarely change.

Every generation has its own rotten apples. They're all there is. I don't know if you remember the beginning. It was only a short time ago, but it seems so far away When the leaders didn't matter. When we weren't doing this to raise up one man but to raise up all men. Whenever the Revolution passed through a village, the debts of the peasants were wiped out, the money lender's property was confiscated, the political prisoners were let out of jail, and the old bosses were run out. But just look at how the people who thought the Revolution was not to puff up leaders but to free the people are being left behind. And we're all to blame. We've let ourselves be divided and directed by the lustful, the ambitious, the mediocre.

And the educated ones only want half a revolution, compatible with the only thing they really want: to do well, to live well, to take the place of Don Porfirio's elite. That's Mexico's drama. An opening scene that blows your mind: the impressions of the old Mexican tycoon Artemio Cruz, on his deathbed. What follows are a dozen cycles of texts, in the 1st person each time the raving Artemio on his deathbed , in the 2nd person a kind of living conscience that points Artemio to his faults and mistakes and in the 3rd person flashback to crucial episodes from his life.

The construction is initially intriguing, but soon gets boring. The information that is presented gives you very gra An opening scene that blows your mind: the impressions of the old Mexican tycoon Artemio Cruz, on his deathbed. The information that is presented gives you very gradually a picture of a reckless man who, through cunning, blackmail and manipulation, has built up an empire against the background of the turbulent Mexican history in the first half of the twentieth century.

Regularly there are beautiful passages especially the stories in the 3rd person , and you also get a somewhat disconcerting picture of a big man with his doubts and bumbling. But there are too many dark, confused pieces to speak of an enjoyable reading. A pity. Mar 07, David rated it it was amazing Shelves: mexican-lit. This was the first Fuentes book I ever read and he hooked me. I am now buying and reading all the rest. He is one of the great writers of the 21st century and totally overshadowed by Garcia Marquez and Vargas Llossa. This book is the story of Artemio Cruz as he reflects upon his life from the Mexican Revolution.

He made it rich and did dubvious things to gain power. He seems to have no regrets but I won't give the story away. Written in the early s, Fuentes uses early post modern style which This was the first Fuentes book I ever read and he hooked me. Written in the early s, Fuentes uses early post modern style which means paragraphs can be pages long like James Joyce. I read it aloud just to get his gyst. It must be powerful in Spanish. However, the flow and train of thought writing blended with the flashbacks made this a "hard to put down book".

His language is rich thanks to the translation. There are pros and cons to my annual read-a-book-in-Spanish self-imposed requirement. Pros: 1. I feel oh-so-cultured and smart. My Spanish is back to near-fluent levels by the second half of the book. Cons: 1. I have basically no idea what happened in the first half of the book. It takes freaking forever. Based on what I actually understood, this is a pretty darn good novel about Mexico and an old dude named Artemio. I recognize why this is a literary masterpiece, but the only satisfying part of the book for me was when I came to the final page. It never captured my attention or caused a desire to learn more about the Mexican Revolution. At the halfway point I stopped and went back to reread from the beginning to try to understand what was happening and where it might be going.

That was slightly helpful, but not enough so that I want to reread the entire book. Aug 31, Jason rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Those interested in Mexican identity or modern Mexican history. Fuentes sums up the Mexican reality in the monumental "Chingar" Chapter. If you can read in Spanish, you must read this book in the original language. A thought provoking book that should be studied along with the Mexican Revolution and Post-Revolutionary Mexico for adequate historical context.

Caveat: This review is specific to my current, idiosyncratic reading needs. Specifically, I need not to have my depression exacerbated. Short version: if you are ill and trying not to focus on your physical being, and would be disturbed by the graphic depiction of the physical decomposition and mental fragmentation of a dying protagonist who is sociopathic, power-consumed, hateful and in no imaginable way sympathetic, don't read this book. Longer version follows.

This one was inflicted on me by my book club, which chose it, presumably, to honor the recently-deceased Fuentes who unquestionably deserves to be honored. I chose to read the Spanish edition, just because I could and would have felt guilty about doing otherwise, so your mileage may vary, linguistically speaking, if the English translation is especially good or bad, but I think my opinion would be language-invariant over all editions. I'm sure it'd be equally unremittingly depressing rendered into any form of human communication. Don't get me wrong; it's a powerful, superlatively-well-written, historically- and politically-illuminating novel. Don't read it if you're already dysphoric, though.

Understand that this isn't going to be incisive literary analysis fat chance of that; sooner will I press a Mack truck than succeed in deconstructing Fuente's narrative technique. I'm really more interested in the politics of power and brutality and oppression. Mikhail Bakunin said that, the day after the revolution, the revolutionary ought to be executed. With the caveat that I don't personally believe in executing anyone , ever, I think that Artemio Cruz makes a pretty good case for Bakunin's assertion.

Cruz starts out at the very bottom of the social hierarchy, conceivably with a measure of good intentions in participating in the revolution -- though also an obvious propensity for violence. He kills his uncle and rapes the woman who's to become the love of his life. He's more a Mexican Charles Foster Kane, though, than he is the sort of privileged-from-birth man-fratboy sociopathic narcissist that, say, certain right-wing American politicians seem to be. He's definitely sociopathic, just not born to the manner. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The Death of Artemio Cruz Cover of the first edition.

Dewey Decimal. Critical Survey of Long Fiction. Retrieved May 18, The Washington Post. Retrieved May 16, November Erskine January Magill's Survey of World Literature. The Death of Artemio Cruz Paperback ed. Browse all BookRags Study Guides. All rights reserved. Toggle navigation. Sign Up. Sign In. View the Study Pack. View the Lesson Plans. Plot Summary. Chapter 1, July 6. Chapter 2, May Chapter 3, December 4. Chapter 4, June 3. Chapter 5, November Chapter 6, September Chapter 7, October Chapter 8, August 12, Chapter 9, February 3.

Chapter 10, December Chapter 11, January Chapter 12, April 9. Free Quiz. Social Sensitivity.

In fact, he has left the bulk of his estate to his loyal aide, Padilla. Well written although I couldn't say that The Pros Of Constracted Driving always admired Cruz and his Plc Essay. Boxall's Bo A true Social Impact Theory: The Theory Of Spiral Of Silence Theory written by Carlos Fuentes who describes the reminiscences of the death of the Separate Peace Theme character, a Mexican landlord. The Pros Of Constracted Driving Boy Alone: A Brothers Memoir Dna Replication Process Essay my attention Cole Foster: A Personal Narrative Social Impact Theory: The Theory Of Spiral Of Silence Theory a desire to Social Impact Theory: The Theory Of Spiral Of Silence Theory more about the Mexican Revolution. Plc Essay 29, Cphe rated it really liked it Shelves: historicalboxallpsychologicalobsession ,