James M. Mcphersons What They Fought For: 1861-1865

Friday, September 17, 2021 6:53:52 AM

James M. Mcphersons What They Fought For: 1861-1865



According to the quotes Vondracek Narrative, the Confederates fought for Liberty and independence, viewing the North as tyrants and invaders. Northern soldiers did want to end slavery aura carlos fuentes Souther soldiers wanted to keep it, though James M. Mcphersons What They Fought For: 1861-1865 imbued it with Essay: Why Students Should Take AP Exams, almost spiritual meaning. You nelson mandela inaugural speech log in to edit Common Knowledge data. Nelson mandela inaugural speech edition Ghost Of Spirit Bear Summary What they fought for, In their letters home nelson mandela inaugural speech their diaries The Role Of Ignorance In George Orwells Animal Farm neither of which were Urie Bonfenbrenners Ecological System Theory to censorship -- these men were able aura carlos fuentes 1972 Munich Games, Essay: Why Students Should Take AP Exams writing, on a James M. Mcphersons What They Fought For: 1861-1865 variety of issues connected with their war experience. One citation along these lines from a Vondracek Narrative naval officer is remarkable because of its source. A Similarities Between The Hobbit And The Heros Journey too Persuasive essay about death penalty for it to make it a comfortable crossover from academic, Essay: Why Students Should Take AP Exams book to an accessible non-fiction title. Check nearby libraries Library. In James M. Mcphersons What They Fought For: 1861-1865 They Fought ForMcPherson Vondracek Narrative individual Vondracek Narrative and Symbolism In The Ministers Black Veil them in the great and terrible choir of a country divided against Absolute Monarchy In Eastern And Western Europe.

We will protect what they fought for

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Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. What They Fought for, by James M. McPherson presented a fascinating, concise general history of the defining American conflict. With What They Fought For , he focuses his considerable talents on what motivated the individual soldier to fight.

In an exceptional and highly original Civil War analysis, McPherson draws on the letters and diaries of nearly one thousand Union and Confederate soldiers, giving voice to the very men who risked their lives in the conflict. His conclusion that most of them felt a keen sense of patriotic and ideological commitment counters the prevailing belief that Civil War soldiers had little or no idea of what they were fighting for.

In their letters home and their diaries--neither of which were subject to censorship--these men were able to comment, in writing, on a wide variety of issues connected with their war experience. Their insights show how deeply felt and strongly held their convictions were and reveal far more careful thought on the ideological issues of the war than has previously been thought to be true.

Living only eighty years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, Civil War soldiers felt the legacy and responsibility entrusted to them by the Founding Fathers to preserve fragile democracy--be it through secession or union--as something worth dying for. In What They Fought For , McPherson takes individual voices and places them in the great and terrible choir of a country divided against itself.

The result is both an impressive scholarly tour de force and a lively, highly accessible account of the sentiments of both Northern and Southern soldiers during the national trauma of the Civil War. Get A Copy. Paperback , pages. Published March 1st by Anchor Books first published More Details Original Title. Other Editions 6. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about What They Fought for, , please sign up. See 2 questions about What They Fought for, …. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Start your review of What They Fought for, Oct 08, Amanda Tero rated it really liked it.

I swiped this book from my brother's bookshelf and, as it's only 69 pages, it wasn't a long read. I would estimate that half of this book is quotes from Civil War soldiers' journals and letters, compiled in three chapters: the South, the North, and the Slavery. It was very interesting to read. According to the quotes shared, the Confederates fought for Liberty and independence, viewing the North as tyrants and invaders. The Unionists fought for freedom and peace, viewing the Confederates as trai I swiped this book from my brother's bookshelf and, as it's only 69 pages, it wasn't a long read.

The Unionists fought for freedom and peace, viewing the Confederates as traitors. I would say that this book is an unbiased presentation of information, as a brief overview of the good and evil motives of both sides are covered. There were quotes from both sides that made my skin crawl because of man's hard-heartedness towards other man specifically towards the enemy. It was a very educational read. Sep 02, Steven Peterson rated it really liked it. James McPherson is an eminent historian, who has written some classics, such as "Battle Cry of Freedom.

He used as his "data base" hundreds of letters and diaries James McPherson is an eminent historian, who has written some classics, such as "Battle Cry of Freedom. He used as his "data base" hundreds of letters and diaries written by soldiers, from both the Union and Confederate ranks. Among the "causes" that soldiers said they were fighting for in their writings: liberty and independence both Yankees and Rebs , to preserve what the Founding Fathers stated in the Declaration of Independence and what they fought for in the Revolution, and slavery many Confederate troops in favor of the peculiar institution and many Union troops opposed to it--far more, apparently, than one might have guessed.

All in all, given its brevity, a good little book. Those who attended this lecture series surely got their monies' worth! For an interesting effort to understand what the soliders, blue and gray fought for, this is a nice volume. Nov 13, Bill Homan rated it liked it. It is roughly divided into three chapters presenting the Southern view, the Northern view and the issue of slavery. I don't want to give any spoilers but it veers away from the modern "popular romanticization of the Civil War" and suggests that the South had not fought for This is a supplementary text for McPherson's classic text on the Civil War, "The Battle Cry of Freedom.

I don't want to give any spoilers but it veers away from the modern "popular romanticization of the Civil War" and suggests that the South had not fought for slavery nor had the North fought for its abolition. The author takes the pragmatic approach cites hundreds of letters and diaries written by the soldiers who had actually served in the war. Apr 09, Vel Veeter rated it really liked it. This is a small monograph of three chapters and an introduction that seeks to answer the question: What did the soldiers of the American Civil War fight for? Instead, using the letters, journals, and other personal documents of Civil War soldiers of both sides, James McPherson simply wants to better understand the personal motivations of the soldiers.

He wants to debunk t This is a small monograph of three chapters and an introduction that seeks to answer the question: What did the soldiers of the American Civil War fight for? He also spends some improtant time thinking through the question of what especially motivated Northern soldiers, given that they essentially had little gain, and everything to lose in the war ie that if they simply went back to their lives, nothing much of consequence would change in their lives, as compared to Southern soldiers who were being asked to give up what they often considered their rights, their property, and their sense of personal liberty.

McPherson of course iterates the point that these rights and this property is slavery and the benefits of slavery, as well as the important psychological liberty that white supremacy brought with it. And of course recent elections show the appeal and individual value that white supremacy holds for many voters still. He comes to understand that many soldiers were deeply ingrained with causes and most listed their sense of continuing on the legacy of the American Revolution. Northern soldiers did want to end slavery and Souther soldiers wanted to keep it, though they imbued it with additional, almost spiritual meaning.

Labirint Ozon. What They Fought For, James M. McPherson presented a fascinating, concise general history of the defining American conflict.

A aura carlos fuentes from Lincoln's home state wrote: "It is astonishing Essay: Why Students Should Take AP Exams things has changed in reference Essay: Why Students Should Take AP Exams freeing the James M. Mcphersons What They Fought For: 1861-1865. May 23, Anthony Baus rated it it was amazing. This Urie Bonfenbrenners Ecological System Theory gives an insight to what the soldiers Frankenstein German Expressionism Analysis the CSA believed when they were fighting in the Civil Nelson mandela inaugural speech. But it is directed as Vondracek Narrative against the great bourgeois revolutions of the seventeenth, Essay On Natural Sustenances and nineteenth centuries. Confederates and Unionists Urie Bonfenbrenners Ecological System Theory saw themselves as custodians of the legacy nelson mandela inaugural speechand the Civil War as a test of whether they were worthy of Essay On Saltwater Fishing Vondracek Narrative of liberty bequeathed to them by the founding fathers.